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ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA

by: William Shakespeare


There's beggary in the love that can be reckoned.

--Antony, Act I, scene i

Kingdoms are clay; our dungy earth alike
Feeds beast as man.

--Antony, Act I, scene i

I love long life better than figs.

--Charmian, Act I, scene ii

None but your sheets are privy to your wishes.

--Alexas, Act I, scene ii

If an oily palm be not a fruitful prognostication, I cannot scratch mine ear.

--Charmian, Act I, scene ii

The nature of bad news infects the teller.

--Messenger, Act I, scene ii

In time we hate that which we often fear.

--Charmian, Act I, scene iii

Eternity was in our lips and eyes,
Bliss in our brows' bent; none our parts so poor
But was a race of heaven.

--Cleopatra, Act I, scene iii

Though age from folly could not give me freedom,
It does from childishness.

--Cleopatra, Act I, scene iii

O, my oblivion is a very Antony,
And I am all forgotten.

--Cleopatra, Act I, scene iii

Our separation so abides and flies
That thou, residing here, goes yet with me,
And I, hence fleeting, here remain with thee.
Away!

--Antony, Act I, scene iii

It hath been taught us from the primal state
That he which is was wished until he were,
And the ebbed man, ne'er loved till ne'er worth love,
Comes deared by being lacked. This common body,
Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
Goes to, and back, lackeying the varying tide,
To rot itself with motion.

--Caesar, Act I, scene iv

My salad days,
When I was green in judgment.

--Cleopatra, Act I, scene iv

Every time serves for the matter that is then born in't.

--Enobarbus, Act II, scene ii

Small to greater matters must give way.

--Lepidus, Act II, scene ii

That which combined us was most great, and let not
A leaner action rend us. What's amiss,
May it be gently heard. When we debate
Our trivial difference loud, we do commit
Murder in healing wounds. Then, noble partners,
The rather for I earnestly beseech,
Touch you the sourest points with sweetest terms,
Nor curstness grow to th'matter.

--Lepidus, Act II, scene ii

The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne,
Burned on the water; the poop was beaten gold;
Purple the sails, and so perfumed that
The winds were love-sick with them; the oars were silver,
Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made
The water which they beat to follow faster,
As amorous of their strokes. For her own person,
It beggared all description.

--Enobarbus, Act II, scene ii

Music--moody food
Of us that trade in love.

--Cleopatra, Act II, scene v

I will praise any man that will praise me.

--Enobarbus, Act II, scene vi

Let not the piece of virtue which is set
Betwixt us, as the cement of our love
To keep it builded, be the ram to batter
The fortress of it. For better might we
Have loved without this mean, if on both parts
This not be cherished.

--Caesar, Act III, scene ii

Egypt, thou knew'st too well
My heart was to thy rudder tied by th' strings,
And thou shouldst tow me after.

--Antony, Act III, scene xi

Fall not a tear, I say; one of them rates
All that is won and lost. Give me a kiss.

--Antony, Act III, scene xi

Women are not
In their best fortunes strong, but want will perjure
the ne'er-touched vestal.

--Caesar, Act III, scene xii

He wears the rose
Of youth upon him.

--Antony, Act III, scene xiii

I see men’s judgments are
A parcel of their fortunes, and things outward
Do draw the inward quality after them,
To suffer all alike.

--Enobarbus, Act III, scene xiii

I and my sword will earn our chronicle.

--Antony, Act III, scene xiii

Let's have one other gaudy night: call to me
All my sad captains; fill our bowls once more;
Let's mock the midnight bell.

--Antony, Act III, scene xiii

I'll make death love me; for I will contend
Even with his pestilent scythe.

--Antony, Act III, scene xiii

To be furious,
Is to be frighted out of fear; and in that mood
The dove will peck the estridge.

--Enobarbus, Act III, scene xiii

When valour preys on reason,
It eats the sword it fights with.

--Enobarbus, Act III, scene xiii

To business that we love we rise betime,
And go to 't with delight.

--Antony, Act IV, scene iv

All strange and terrible events are welcome,
But comforts we despise.

--Cleopatra, Act IV, scene xiii

What's brave, what's noble,
Let's do it after the high Roman fashion,
And make death proud to take us.

--Cleopatra, Act IV, scene xiii

Sometime we see a cloud that's dragonish;
A vapour sometime like a bear or lion,
A towered citadel, a pendent rock,
A forked mountain, or blue promontory
With trees upon 't, that nod unto the world
And mock our eyes with air.

--Antony, Act IV, scene xiv

That which is now a horse, even with a thought
The rack dislimns, and makes it indistinct,
As water is in water.

--Antony, Act IV, scene xiv

I will be
A bridegroom in my death, and run into 't
As to a lover's bed.

--Antony, Act IV, scene xiv

None but Antony
Should conquer Antony.

--Cleopatra, Act IV, scene xv

O, withered is the garland of the war,
The soldier's pole is fallen; young boys and girls
Are level now with men; the odds is gone,
And there is nothing left remarkable
Beneath the visiting moon.

--Cleopatra, Act IV, scene xv

'Tis paltry to be Caesar;
Not being Fortune, he's but Fortune's knave,
A minister of her will: and it is great
To do that thing that ends all other deeds;
Which shackles accidents and bolts up change;
Which sleeps, and never palates more the dug,
The beggar's nurse and Caesar's.

--Cleopatra, Act V, scene ii

What poor an instrument may do a noble deed!

--Cleopatra, Act V, scene ii

My resolution's placed, and I have nothing
Of woman in me: now from head to foot
I am marble-constant; now the fleeting moon
No planet is of mine.

--Cleopatra, Act V, scene ii

I know that a woman is a dish for the gods,
if the devil dress her not.

--Clown, Act V, scene ii

I wish you all joy of the worm.

--Clown, Act V, scene ii

I am fire and air; my other elements
I give to baser life.

--Cleopatra, Act V, scene ii

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