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CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS

by: Rudyard Kipling


The place was packed as full of smells as a bale is of cotton.

--Chapter 1

Like many other unfortunate young people, Harvey had never in all his life received a direct order - never, at least, without long, and sometimes tearful, explanations of the advantages of obedience and the reasons for the request.

--Chapter 1

Disko spoke of whaling voyages in the Fifties; of great she-whales slain beside their young; of death agonies on the black, tossing seas, and blood that spurted forty feet in the air; of boats smashed to splinters; of patent rockets that went off wrong-end-first and bombarded the trembling crews; of cutting-in and boiling-down, and that terrible "nip" of '71, when twelve hundred men were made homeless on the ice in three days--wonderful tales, all true. But more wonderful still were his stories of the cod, and how they argued and reasoned on their private businesses deep down belowed the keel.

--Chapter 5

An angry skipper makes an unhappy crew.

--Chapter 6

The thing that struck him most was the exceedingly casual way in which some craft loafed about the broad Atlantic. Fishing Boats, as Dan said, were naturally dependent on the courtesy and wisdom of their neighbours; but one expected better things of steamers.

--Chapter 6

Whatever his private sorrows may be, a multi-millionaire, like any other working man, should keep abreast of his business.

--Chapter 9

After violent emotion most people and all boys demand food.

--Chapter 9

It began with a kinless boy turned loose in Texas, and went on fantastically through a hundred changes and chops of life, the scenes shifting from State after Western State, from cities that sprang up in a month and in a season utterly withered away, to wild ventures in wilder camps that are now laborious paved municipalities. It covered the building of three railroads and the deliberate wreck of a fourth. It told of steamers, townships, forests, and mines, and the men of every nation under heaven, manning, creating, hewing, and digging these. It touched on chances of gigantic wealth flung before eyes that could not see, or missed by the merest accident of time and travel; and through the mad shift of things, sometimes on horseback, more often afoot, now rich, now poor, in and out, and back and forth, deck-hand, train-hand, contractor, boarding-house keeper, journalist, engineer, drummer, real-estate agent, politician, dead-beat, rum-seller, mine-owner, speculator, cattleman, or tramp, moved Harvey Cheyne, alert and quiet, seeking his own ends, and, so he said, the glory and advancement of his country.

--Chapter 10

Every one wanted to say so much that no one said anything in particular.

--Chapter 10

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