Literary Quotations
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GABRIEL GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ QUOTES


Love in the Time of Cholera (1985)

The scalpel is the greatest proof of the failure of medicine.

--Chapter 1

There was no innocence more dangerous than the innocence of age.

--Chapter 1

Wisdom comes to us when it can no longer do any good.

--Chapter 1

It is a pity to still find a suicide that is not for love.

--Chapter 1

Most fatal diseases had their own specific odor, but ... none was as specific as old age.

--Chapter 1

The man who has no memory makes one out of paper.

--Chapter 1

The weak would never enter the kingdom of love, which is a harsh and ungenerous kingdom.

--Chapter 2

The heart's memory eliminates the bad and magnifies the good, and ... thanks to this artifice we manage to endure the burden of the past.

--Chapter 3

Nothing one does in bed is immoral if it helps to perpetuate love.

--Chapter 3

You have to know languages when you go to sell something ... But when you go to buy, everyone does what he must to understand you.

--Chapter 3

Human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but ... life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.

--Chapter 4

A man knows when he is growing old because he begins to look like his father.

--Chapter 4

Nobody teaches life anything.

--Chapter 4

The problem with marriage is that it ends every night after making love, and it must be rebuilt every morning before breakfast.

--Chapter 4

A man should have two wives: one to love and one to sew on his buttons.

--Chapter 4

My heart has more rooms than a whorehouse.

--Chapter 5

Old age was not a rushing torrent but a bottomless cistern where ... memory drained away.

--Chapter 6

I do not believe in God, but I am afraid of Him.

--Chapter 6

Humanity, like armies in the field, advances at the speed of the slowest.

--Chapter 6

Love becomes greater and nobler in calamity.

--Chapter 6

One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967)

Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, General Aureliano Buendia was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.

--Chapter 1

At that time Macondo was a village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white and enormous, like prehistoric eggs. The world was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it was necessary to point.

--Chapter 1

They were new gypsies, young men and women who knew only their own language, handsome specimens with oily skins and intelligent hands, whose dances and music sowed a panic of uproarious joy through the streets, with parrots painted all colors reciting Italian arias, and a hen who laid a hundred golden eggs to the sound of a tambourine, and a trained monkey who read minds.

--Chapter 1

The only difference today between Liberals and Conservatives is that the Liberals go to mass at five o'clock and the Conservatives at eight.

--Chapter 6

All day long she would embroider beside the window, withdrawn from the uneasiness of the war, until the ceramic pots would begin to vibrate in the cupboard and she would get up to warm the meal.

--Chapter 6

When he was alone, José Arcadio Buendía consoled himself with the dream of the infinite rooms. He dreamed that he was getting out of bed, opening the door, and going into an identical room with the same bed with a wrought-iron head, the same wicker chair, and the same small picture of the Virgin of Help on the back wall. From that room he would go into another that was just the same, the door of which would open into another that was just the same, the door of which would open into another that was just the same, the door of which would open into another one just the same, and then into another exactly alike, and so on to infinity.

--Chapter 7

Carmelia Montiel, a twenty-year-old virgin, had just bathed in orange-blossom water and was strewing rosemary leaves on Pilar Ternera's bed when the shot rang out. Aureliano José had been destined to find with her the happiness that Amaranta had denied him, to have seven children, and to die in her arms of old age, but the bullet that entered his back and shattered his chest had been directed by a wrong interpretation of the cards.

--Chapter 8

"You can't come in, colonel," she told him. "You may be in command of your war, but I'm in command of my house."

--Chapter 9

The countless women he had known on the desert of love and who had spread his seed all along the coast had left no trace in his feelings. Most of them had come into his room in the dark and had left before dawn, and on the following day they were nothing but a touch of fatigue in his bodily memory.

--Chapter 9

Remedios the Beauty ... was becalmed in a magnificent adolescence, more and more impenetrable to formality, more and more indifferent to malice and suspicion, happy in her own world of simple realities. She did not understand why women complicated their lives with corsets and petticoats, so she sewed herself a cassock that she simply put over her and without further difficulties resolved the problem of dress, without taking away the feeling of being naked, which according to her lights was the only decent way to be when at home.

--Chapter 12

He tried to reconstruct in his imagination the annihilated splendor of the old banana-company town, whose dry swimming pool was filled to the brim with rotting men's and women's shoes, and in the houses of which, destroyed by rye grass, he found the skeleton of a German shepherd dog still tied to a ring by a steel chain and a telephone that was ringing, ringing, ringing until he picked it up and an anguished and distant woman spoke in English, and he said yes, that the strike was over, that three thousand dead people had been thrown into the sea, that the banana company had left, and that Macondo finally had peace after many years.

--Chapter 19

The world must be all fucked up when men travel first class and literature goes as freight.

--Chapter 20