Literary Quotations
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BRAM STOKER QUOTES


Dracula (1897)

It is the eve of St. George's Day. Do you not know that tonight, when the clock strikes midnight, all the evil things in the world will have full sway?

--Chapter 1

I read that every known superstition in the world is gathered into the horseshoe of the Carpathians, as if it were the centre of some sort of imaginative whirlpool; if so my stay may be very interesting.

--Chapter 1

Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long, agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then another and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imagination could grasp it through the gloom of the night.

--Chapter 1

We are in Transylvania, and Transylvania is not England. Our ways are not your ways, and there shall be to you many strange things.

--Chapter 2

I was afraid to raise my eyelids, but looked out and saw perfectly under the lashes. The fair girl went on her knees, and bent over me, fairly gloating. There was a deliberate voluptuousness which was both thrilling and repulsive, and as she arched her neck she actually licked her lips like an animal, till I could see in the moonlight the moisture shining on the scarlet lips and on the red tongue as it lapped the white sharp teeth. Lower and lower went her head as the lips went below the range of my mouth and chin and seemed to fasten on my throat. I could feel the soft, shivering touch of the lips on the supersensitive skin of my throat, and the hard dents of two sharp teeth, just touching and pausing there. I closed my eyes in a languorous ecstacy and waited - waited with beating heart.

--Chapter 3

Despair has its own calms.

--Chapter 4

No man knows till he has suffered from the night how sweet and dear to his heart and eye the morning can be.

--Chapter 4

The last I saw of Count Dracula was his kissing his hand to me; with a red light of triumph in his eyes, and with a smile that Judas in hell might be proud of.

--Chapter 4

Why can't they let a girl marry three men, or as many as want her, and save all this trouble?

--Chapter 5

For life be, after all, only a waitin' for somethin' else than what we're doin', and death be all that we can rightly depend on.

--Chapter 6

Infinitesimal distinctions between man and man are too paltry for an Omnipotent Being. How these madmen give themselves away! The real God taketh heed lest a sparrow fall; but the God created from human vanity sees no difference between an eagle and a sparrow.

--Chapter 8

No man knows till he experiences it, what it is like to feel his own life-blood drawn away into the woman he loves.

--Chapter 10

We learn from failure, not from success!

--Chapter 10

I have always thought that a wild animal never looks so well as when some obstacle of pronounced durability is between us. A personal experience has intensified rather than diminished that idea.

--Chapter 11

The blood is the life!

--Chapter 11

How blessed are some people, whose lives have no fears, no dreads, to whom sleep is a blessing that comes nightly, and brings nothing but sweet dreams.

--Chapter 11

Oh, friend John, it is a strange world, a sad world, a world full of miseries, and woes, and troubles. And yet when King Laugh come, he make them all dance to the tune he play.

--Chapter 13

King Laugh he come like the sunshine, and he ease off the strain again; and we bear to go on with our labour, what it may be.

--Chapter 13

Faith:... that faculty which enables us to believe things which we know to be untrue.

--Chapter 14

We shall have an open mind, and not let a little bit of truth check the rush of a big truth, like a small rock does a railway truck. We get the small truth first. Good! We keep him, and we value him; but all the same we must not let him think himself all the truth in the universe.

--Chapter 14

She is one of God's women, fashioned by His own hand to show us men and other women that there is a heaven where we can enter, and that its light can be here on earth.

--Chapter 14

You are clever man, friend John; you reason well, and your wit is bold; but you are too prejudiced. You do not let your eyes see nor your ears hear, and that which is outside your daily life is not of account to you. Ah, it is the fault of our science that it wants to explain all; and if it explain not, then it says there is nothing to explain.

--Chapter 14

I have learned not to think little of any one's belief, no matter how strange it may be. I have tried to keep an open mind, and it is not the ordinary things of life that could close it, but the strange things, the extraordinary things, the things that make one doubt if they be mad or sane.

--Chapter 14

There are mysteries which men can only guess at, which age by age they may solve only in part.

--Chapter 15

A brave man's hand can speak for itself; it does not even need a woman's love to hear its music.

--Chapter 18

There are such beings as vampires, some of us have evidence that they exist. Even had we not the proof of our own unhappy experience, the teachings and the records of the past give proof enough for sane peoples.

--Chapter 18

My revenge is just begun! I spread it over centuries, and time is on my side. Your girls that you all love are mine already; and through them you and others shall yet be mine - my creatures, to do my bidding and to be my jackals when I want to feed.

--Chapter 23

Sleep has no place it can call its own.

--Chapter 23

We are all drifting reefwards now, and faith is our only anchor.

--Chapter 23

Even my own terrible experiences in Castle Dracula seem like a long-forgotten dream. Here in the crisp autumn air in the bright sunlight.

--Chapter 24

A half-thought has been buzzing often in my brain, but I fear to let him loose his wings. Here now, with more knowledge, I go back to where that half-thought come from, and I find that he be no half-thought at all; that be a whole thought, though so young that he is not yet strong to use his little wings.

--Chapter 25

The little bird, the little fish, the little animal learn not by principle, but empirically; and when he learn to do, then there is to him the ground to start from to do more.

--Chapter 25