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SONS AND LOVERS

by: D.H. Lawrence


When love enters, the whole spiritual constitution of a man changes, is filled with the Holy Ghost, and almost his form is altered.

--Part I, Chapter 2

There were many, many stages in the ebbing of her love for him, but it was always ebbing.

--Part I, Chapter 3

He was an outsider. He had denied the God in him.

--Part I, Chapter 4

But still, in her heart of hearts, where the love should have burned, there was a blank. Now, when all her woman's pity was roused to its full extent, when she would have slaved herself to death to nurse him and to save hum, when she would have taken the pain herself, if she could, somewhere far away inside her, she felt indifferent to him and to his suffering. It hurt her most of all, this failure to love him, even when he roused her strong emotions.

--Part I, Chapter 5

The man was the work and the work was the man, one thing, for the time being. It was different with the girls. The real woman never seemed to be there at the task, but as if left out, waiting.

--Part I, Chapter 5

The trains roared by like projectiles level on the darkness, fuming and burning, making the valley clang with their passage. They were gone, and the lights of the towns and villages glittered in silence.

--Part I, Chapter 5

There's a feel of men about trucks, because they've been handled with men's hands, all of them.

--Part I, Chapter 6

Her great companion was her mother. They were both brown-eyed, and inclined to be mystical, such women as treasure religion inside them, breathe it in their nostrils, and see the whole of life in a mist thereof.

--Part II, Chapter 7

All the life of Miriam's body was in her eyes, which were usually dark as a dark church, but could flame with light like a conflagration. Her face scarcely ever altered from its look of brooding. She might have been one of the women who went with Mary when Jesus was dead. Her body was not flexible and living.

--Part II, Chapter 7

She seemed to need things kindling in her imagination or in her soul before she felt she had them. And she was cut off from ordinary life by her religious intensity which made the world for her either a nunnery garden or a paradise, where sin and knowledge were not, or else an ugly, cruel thing.

--Part II, Chapter 7

On the whole, she scorned the male sex. But here was a new specimen, quick, light, graceful, who could be gentle and who could be sad, and who was clever, and who knew a lot, and who had a death in the family.

--Part II, Chapter 7

They were going to have a communion together - something that thrilled her, something holy.

--Part II, Chapter 7

One should be religious in everything, have God, whatever God might be, present in everything.

--Part II, Chapter 9

You're always begging things to love you as if you were a beggar for love. Even the flowers, you have to fawn on them -- You don't want to love -- your eternal and abnormal craving is to be loved. You aren't positive, you're negative. You absorb, absorb, as if you must fill yourself up with love, because you've got a shortage somewhere.

--Part II, Chapter 9

One should feel inside oneself for right and wrong, and should have the patience to gradually realise one's God.

--Part II, Chapter 10

A house o' women is as dead as a house wi' no fire, to my thinkin'. I'm not a spider as likes to corner myself. I like a man about, if he's only something to snap at.

--Part II, Chapter 10

He was like so many young men of his own age. Sex had become so complicated in him that he would have denied that he ever could want Clara or Miriam or any woman whom he _knew_. Sex desire was a sort of detached thing, that did not belong to a woman.

--Part II, Chapter 10

He grew warm at the thought of Clara, he battled with her, he knew the curves of her breast and shoulders as if they had been moulded inside him.

--Part II, Chapter 10

She would submit, religiously, to the sacrifice. He should have her. And at the thought her whole body clenched itself involuntarily, hard, as if against something; but Life forced her through this gate of suffering, too, and she would submit. At any rate, it would give him what he wanted, which was her deepest wish.

--Part II, Chapter 11

She turned to him with a splendid movement. Her mouth was offered him, and her throat; her eyes were half-shut; her breast was tilted as if it asked for him. He flashed with a small laugh, shut his eyes, and met her in a long, whole kiss. Her mouth fused with his; their bodies were sealed and annealed.

--Part II, Chapter 12

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